Virfac® engines and our new born superfast GPU solver

Virfac iAM offers a disruptive technology based on a new generation solver engine entirely dedicated to the modelling of additive manufacturing. Virfac iAM is connected to the powerful Barracuda solver developed by GeonX, which runs on GPU processors bringing teraflop computing to desktop. Our new solver demonstrates amazing speed-up factors compared to conventional finite element solvers. The new Virfac iAM module aims to become the true virtual manufacturing simulator side by side to the manufacturing machine.

Virfac® engines and our new born superfast GPU solver



Multiphysics and Multiscale simulation of the Additive Manufacturing using Virfac® AM

Multiphysics and Multiscale simulation of the Additive Manufacturing using Virfac



Virfac® Results & Experimental Validations

1

Selective Laser Melting simulation of the ENGIE functional part Twister

By GeonX in collaboration with ENGIE Laborelec (Belgium)

This project aims to predict by means of simulation the risk of failure at the interface between the supports and the Twister part printed by ENGIE Laborelec, an expertise and research centre in electrical power technology. The Twister component is used in an air extraction pump of a combined cycle gas turbine plant condenser [1]. The simulations were carried out using Virfac® iAM developed by GeonX, demonstrating a good match between the experiments and the simulation.

Selective Laser Melting simulation of the ENGIE functional part Twister using Virfac®

Despite the absence of hot spots, which are common indicators of failure in the build, this part exhibits rupturing at the interface between the supports and the part. Virfac® iAM is able to predict this effect as shown by the red spots in the displacement map in the video hereafter.



The part is 113.5 mm long along its axis, with the vanes around it up to a radius of 50 mm. The part is built at an inclination of 10°, and placed on supports in such a way that the shortest support height is 10 mm and the longest is 24mm.


The simulations were set up, carried out to completion, and the results were analyzed in 12 hours, and delivered in less than 24 hours from the time when the data was received from ENGIE. This was made possible thanks to the powerful solver of Virfac® iAM. The simulations are in fact faster than the real build time on the part which is approximately 22 hours.

2

Airplane Bearing Bracket

For this validation of Virfac® AM, GeonX has worked with its partner Sirris. A TiAl6V airplane bearing bracket was printed using a support designed with MAGICS (Materialise). Virfac® was used to simulate the 3D printing of the complex workpiece with a support structure representative of the one suggested by MAGICS. Residual stresses and distortions were calculated before and after the removal of the supports from the part. The computation time on this application was about 5 hours in Distributed Parallel using 12 cores on a desktop computer.